Teeth cancer incidence drops in WA, WA Premier says

An oral health outcome study in Western Australia has found that there was no significant decline in the number of people who died from cancer during the 12 months from March 2015 to March 2016.

Key points: The state recorded a slight decline in cancer deaths during the study periodThe study included a cohort of 988 men and women from a regional area that included the state capital and surrounding areasThe results showed the incidence of oral cancers decreased in the WA region in the 12-month period between March and March 2016The findings were published in the Journal of Oral Health.

The study involved nine regions across Western Australia including Western Australia’s Capital City, Ballarat, and the Central Coast, as well as the south-east of the state.

Dr Sarah Firth, of the Western Australia Cancer Council, said it was very encouraging to see the results of the study.

“This is a good news for our communities and also for our doctors and researchers.”

I would encourage the public to continue to take oral health seriously and to consider oral health in their diet.

“The analysis included a nationwide cohort of people aged 65 and over, who had not previously been diagnosed with oral cancer.

There were 8,000 people in the cohort who died of cancer in the study, and they had a total of 6,066 deaths.

Overall, the study found no significant change in the risk of dying from cancer over the 12 month period.

‘Very promising’The study also found that in the Capital City region, there was a statistically significant reduction in the overall risk of death from cancer.”

Dr Firth noted that while the results showed a slight reduction in cancer mortality, the data was not conclusive on whether the decrease was due to lifestyle changes, such as reducing smoking and drinking.”

The only difference in the outcomes was that the overall incidence rate of oral cancer did decrease, and it did not vary significantly from region to region.”

Dr Firth noted that while the results showed a slight reduction in cancer mortality, the data was not conclusive on whether the decrease was due to lifestyle changes, such as reducing smoking and drinking.

She said the results were very promising, but it was important to remember that people had to be monitored and follow up over the period.

“These findings should not be seen as conclusive, but as further evidence that there are important lifestyle changes that can be taken to improve oral health,” she said.

“We are also aware that many people will continue to need regular oral health checks, and we would encourage people to continue this advice.”

Topics:cancer,cancer-research,cancer prevention,lifestyle-and-activity,health,diseases-and_disorders,health-policy,cancer,wash-5280,warwick-4802,ararat-4718,south-carolina,vic,canberra-2600,sydney-2000More stories from Victoria

Back To Top