When your teeth are getting dirty

Posted May 15, 2018 11:31:54A common misconception about tooth decay is that it is caused by the decay of the tooth itself, but there is no evidence to support this, according to research published today.

Key points:Researchers found that tooth decay can be linked to a range of conditions including obesity, smoking, drinking and using drugsThere is no known cure for tooth decay, but scientists are working on new ways to fight itResearchers from the University of Melbourne’s School of Public Health and Public Health Research, led by Dr Joanna Geddes, said it was important for adults to be aware of how tooth decay affected their oral health and to make informed choices about their dental health.

“It is important that we have a good understanding of the potential risks associated with tooth decay and what can be done to reduce those risks,” Dr Geddis said.

“Tobacco use is one of the main risk factors for tooth loss, with smoking, alcohol, and using prescription medications being the main sources of dental caries.”

Tobaccyx is a tooth disease caused by bacteria.

It can cause inflammation in the tooth and cause inflammation of surrounding structures.

The team looked at data from the Australian Community Health Survey from 2013-15 and found a significant association between tooth decay rates and factors that could be associated with obesity, obesity-related lifestyle, obesity in children, alcohol use and obesity in adults.

Dr Gedds said the study showed there was evidence to suggest that poor dental health could increase the risk of tooth decay.

“We found that if a person had a tooth that was poor in health, that tooth was at higher risk of decay,” she said.

Dr John Young, director of the Australian Dental Health Research Institute at Curtin University, said there was a lack of good information about the impact of obesity on dental health and the potential of dental disease to lead to chronic disease.

“Our dental health is an issue that’s really getting under the radar,” he said.

He said dental cariousy could increase risk for a range, including infections and conditions such as gum disease and cavities.

Dr Young said there were different ways that dental disease could impact oral health, including through the effects of stress and physical activity.

“One of the things we’re really focusing on is understanding what can influence dental health,” he told ABC Radio Perth.

“What can we do to prevent dental cariology and prevent people from having dental problems in the first place?”

He said that understanding how dental disease affected oral health was important to the development of new therapies.

“There’s a lot of good work being done on the tooth health side, and I think there’s a real opportunity in terms of improving dental health as well.”

Dr Young added that dentists needed to take the opportunity to make more informed choices.

“Dentists need to be more aware of what they’re doing and what’s actually going on in their mouths, and how they’re actually using their mouths,” he added.

“If you have a poor oral health or dental health that’s affecting you, you’re probably going to need a bit of a look at what you’re doing.”

Dr Gennie Wilson, a dental researcher at the University and chair of the Faculty of Dentistry, said dental health was a complex issue.

“A lot of the information we’ve been collecting about oral health is very basic, it’s based on oral hygiene, it can be pretty superficial and it’s just anecdotal and there’s no proven evidence that it’s effective,” she told ABC Perth.

Dr Wilson said she thought there was an important need for more research on dental carias.

“I think there are a lot more studies that are going to be needed, and it’ll be a while before we can actually say that tooth care is actually helping us improve our oral health,” she added.

Dr Joanna Molloy, director general of the National Dental Association, said the research showed there were some important lessons for dentists and dentists needn’t be complacent.

“The idea of being a dentist in a daycare, in a supermarket or a restaurant or anywhere else, we all need to take into account that we can do this together and be part of the solution,” she stated.

Topics:dentistry,dental-health,health,dentists-and-medical-professionals,health-policy,people,health—other-health-diseases,australia

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